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Occupational Lung Diseases

What are Occupational Lung Diseases? Occupational lung diseases, such as silicosis, occupational asthma and asbestosis, are caused by breathing in harmful substances and irritants like silica, chemical fumes and asbestos. Who is at risk of developing an occupational lung disease? There are certain industries which are linked to higher percentages of workers developing respiratory and lung diseases, including the mining, construction, ship building, insulation and chemical refinement industries. Inhalation of chemical fumes and dusts within these occupations can cause the development of lung diseases such as: Silicosis Asbestosis Occupational asthma Black lung Respiratory acidosis This is not an exhaustive list.
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Occupational Skin Diseases

What are Occupational Skin Diseases? Irritants found in the workplace, such as chemicals, glues and dusts, have the potential to cause painful skin conditions. There are different types of occupational skin diseases, the most common work-related skin disease is industrial dermatitis, which is caused by exposure to certain allergens. The severity of work-related skin diseases varies widely. If you have a skin disease that has been caused by work, you may be able to make a claim for compensation. Who is at risk of developing an occupational skin disease? People coming into contact with chemicals and dusts through their occupation
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Mesothelioma

What is Mesothelioma? Pleural mesothelioma is an incurable cancer that affects the lining of the lungs. Less commonly it can affect the lining of the abdomen (peritoneal mesothelioma) or the heart (pericardial mesothelioma). Nearly all cases of mesothelioma are caused by exposure to asbestos dust. The disease and associated symptoms only present themselves many years after the asbestos exposure occurred, usually between 10 and 50 years. Who is at risk of developing mesothelioma? Mesothelioma can develop after minimal exposure to asbestos, either through work or an occupational activity. The cancer develops in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos during
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Hand Arm Vibration

Hand Arm Vibration Hand-arm vibration syndrome, also known as vibration white finger, is a common industrial injury caused by regular and extended use of vibrating tools. Who is at risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome? Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) can develop in people who have regular extended use of vibrating tools, such as chipping hammers, chainsaws, grinders, pneumatic drills and jackhammers. HAVS affects the joints, blood vessels and nerves around the hand and wrist. The most common symptoms are a tingling, numbness or pain in the fingers, and sometimes a loss of dexterity in the hands, making it hard to
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Asbestos Pleural Thickening

Asbestos-related Pleural Thickening? Asbestos dust and fibres can cause a range of diseases such as asbestosis, pleural effusions, mesothelioma, lung cancer and much more.  Asbestos-related pleural thickening is just one of the many illnesses that can be contracted from contact with asbestos. What is Asbestos-related Pleural Thickening? Pleural thickening is a lung disease that can be caused by inhaling asbestos dust and fibres. Pleural thickening refers to the thickening of the lining of the lung, called the pleura – a thin membrane that covers the inside of the rib-cage and the outside of the lungs. Diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) develops
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Asbestos Pleural Effusions

Asbestos-related Pleural Effusions? Pleural effusions may develop for a number of reasons. They are also usually accompanied by other asbestos-related diseases such as lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. What are Asbestos-related Pleural Effusions? The pleura – a thin membrane that covers the inside of the rib-cage and the outside of the lungs – is made up of two layers and produces a fluid to help the lungs move smoothly as we breath. If this fluid builds up, this is known as a pleural effusion. One of the known causes of pleural effusions are lung diseases following exposure to asbestos dust
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Asbestos Lung Cancer

Asbestos-related Lung Cancer Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the UK. It is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells, which do not develop into healthy lung tissue, and divide rapidly to form tumours. Smoking is the most common cause of lung cancer, but there are other recognised causes, such as exposure to asbestos dust and fibres. What is Asbestos-related Lung Cancer? Asbestos-related lung cancer develops after inhaled asbestos fibres become trapped in the lungs. Over long periods of time, the fibres cause inflammation and damage to the lung tissue. After many years, often decades,
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Asbestosis

Asbestosis Asbestos was a white-coloured material used in flooring, insulation and roofing. It isn’t used today and is generally harmless when it’s left undisturbed. However, if it is moved around it can release a fine dust made of asbestos fibres, which can cause asbestosis. What is Asbestosis? Asbestosis is a form of lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos dust and fibres. In the majority of cases, asbestosis will have little or no impact on a person’s life-span. The disease usually progresses slowly and in many cases remains stable. In rare instances, deterioration can be more rapid, but there is no
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Trainees

At Birchall Blackburn Law we acknowledge that our success is due to our people. Our trainees are valued members of our teams and we aim to continue to build their careers at Birchall Blackburn Law after qualification. Many of our previous trainees have developed successful careers at the firm and a number of our Partners were previously trainees here. Our Training Contracts are divided up into four, six month seats in at least three different practice areas, where you will work with people at all levels of the business, including partners, learning through practice and observation. The experience you gain
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Don’t smoke in a car when children are present?

MP’s are shortly to have a free vote on an amendment to the Children and Families bill to ban smoking in cars whilst there are children present. The bill is designed to protect children from the harmful effects of secondary smoke inhalation. The amendment has certainly found favour with GPs and senior health care experts, with over 700 signing a recent letter published in the British Medical Journal. The letter urges GP to back the ban, which would affect drivers in England. Unsurprisingly, the letter points out that smoking in cars exposes children to dangerously high levels of tobacco smoke
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